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"Intangible Heritage of Korea and China Silk Weaving" unveiled at the Korean National Intangible Heritage Center
This exhibition introduces the history of sericulture and presents silk weaving techniques in Korea and China and subsequent culture derived from silk weaving in an all-inclusive fashion.
On November 8, 2018, the international exchange exhibition entitled "Intangible Heritage of Korea and China Silk Weaving" jointly being held by the Korean National Intangible Heritage Center and the China National Silk Museum unveiled at the Korean National Intangible Heritage Center.

Silk is one of the definitive textiles of East Asia, and the procedure of creating silk through sericulture and weaving silk thread into silk is  a long-standing intangible heritage of both Korea and China. In general, fabric made from the strands of silk thread unwound from silkworm cocoons is known as bidan in Korea. In practice, however, the names of silk fabrics vary according to the types of thread and weaving methods applied, to  include twill damask (neung), gauze (sa), sheer fabric gauze (la), satin(dan), and gold woven silk fabrics (jikgeum). Among the various silk weaving techniques, in Korea, Myeongju jjagi, which refers to the crafting of plain-weave silk, was designated as National Intangible Heritage Property No. 87 in 1988. In China, "Sericulture and Silk Craftsmanship of China" and "Craftsmanship of Nanjing Yunjin brocade" were inscribed in 2009 0n  UNESCO's Represenative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

This exhibition introduces the history of sericulture and presents silk weaving techniques in Korea and China and subsequent culture derived from silk weaving in an all-inclusive fashion. The Korea section begins with silk weaving tools and the crafting process of Myeongju jjagi and a variety of silk fabrics through diverse artifacts. The China section also displays many kinds of silk fabrics which have been designated as UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The exhibition will provide viewers with an opportunity to discover how weaving techniques and the related culture of Korea and China have respectively developed and what common features and distinctions can be found in the process.

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